Sony chief executive Kazuo Hirai to step down

Sony’s chief executive Kazuo Hirai is stepping down and handing the reins over to finance chief Kenichiro Yoshida.

Mr Yoshida, Sony’s chief financial officer, is to take over control of the Japanese electronics giant from 1 April.

Mr Hirai will remain at Sony as chairman.

Mr Yoshida and Mr Hirai have been instrumental in turning Sony around to focus on smartphone image sensors.

Under their efforts, the Japanese electronic giant sold off its struggling PC business and launched the successful PlayStation 4 video game console, which has sold more than 60 million units to date.

Sony said its profits quadrupled in the three months to December.

The Japanese electronics giant reported a record profit of 351 billion yen ($3.2bn, £2.5bn) for the quarter, compared with 92.4 billion yen in the same period the year before.

“As the company approaches a crucial juncture, when we will embark on a new mid-range plan, I consider this to be the ideal time to pass the baton of leadership to new management, for the future of Sony and also for myself to embark on a new chapter in my life,” said Mr Hirai in a statement.

Mr Yoshida said he wanted to build on the management foundation created under Mr Hirai’s leadership to “improve Sony’s competitiveness as a global company”.

Source: BBC

Is Samsung about to release final Galaxy S8 Android 8.0 Oreo update?

It looks like Samsung is sending out a final thank you message to everyone who participated in the Galaxy S8 and S8+ Oreo beta program and could be close to releasing the official update. A few users are seeing a new notice about the beta in the Samsung Members app, with the Galaxy Beta team simply saying that it is doing its “best to distribute the official S/W version”. No date or ETA is mentioned this time around, but since the beta team had earlier said it’s aiming for a stable release by January 31st, could the update be on its way?

Galaxy S8 Oreo update: Official rollout imminent?

It would be improper to come to conclusions based on the latest beta notice, but at least users outside the US could see the final update come out before the week is over, if we go by how long it took Samsung to release the Nougat update after the Galaxy S7 beta program ended. Even if they don’t, stateside Galaxy S8 and S8+ owners are likely to go through a longer wait than others as the beta program for North American users ended only four days back.

As mentioned in the notice, folks using the beta will get the final release a day before everyone else. Not a very good gesture for those who acted as guinea pigs for the company, but with the second month of 2018 almost here, we just want to see that notification about Android 8.0 Oreo being available, no conditions applied. Fingers crossed we don’t have to wait too long now.

Source: Sammobile.com

Galaxy S8 Oreo beta ends January 26 in the US

Samsung notified Galaxy S8 Oreo beta members in India three weeks ago that the beta program is going to end on January 15. It sent out another notice the following week to beta members in the United Kingdom informing them that the beta is going to end on January 17. Samsung has now confirmed when the Android 8.0 Oreo beta for the Galaxy S8 and the Galaxy S8+ is going to end in the United States.

Galaxy S8 Oreo beta ending soon in the US

The company has posted a notice in its Samsung Members app confirming that the Galaxy S8 Oreo beta ends in the United States on January 26, that’s today. Samsung released the 7th and final Oreo beta firmware for the Galaxy S8 and the Galaxy S8+ last week.

Once the beta ends, Samsung will no longer release any beta firmware and will not provide a response to feedback from members of the program. However, the community will remain open for communication between beta users.

Samsung promised in the beta notice it posted in the app two weeks ago that it will do its “best to distribute the official S/W version in January as soon as possible.” Samsung says in the latest notice that “we look forward to releasing the official software update as soon as we can.”

It’s still unclear when Samsung intends to release Android 8.0 for the Galaxy S8 and the Galaxy S8+ to the public. It shouldn’t be too long now as once the beta program ends, the next release is always the stable, public version.

 

 

SOURCE: sammobile.com

Hey Samsung, where’s your in-display fingerprint sensor?

It has consistently been rumored for the past few years that Samsung is going to introduce optical fingerprint recognition technology with a flagship smartphone. The Galaxy S8 was rumored to be the first commercially available smartphone with an in-display fingerprint sensor but that didn’t happen. It decided against the idea because apparently, the technology wasn’t ready.

We then heard the same rumors about the Galaxy Note 8 as well but even it didn’t feature an in-display fingerprint sensor. Samsung reportedly abandoned the idea for the Galaxy Note 8 due to technical challenges, it was having a hard time manufacturing an integrated circuit that was to be placed under the display’s surface to read the fingerprint image. With a Chinese manufacturer having launched a mid-range smartphone with an in-display fingerprint sensor this week, one has to ask Samsung why it’s no longer leading the way in innovative smartphone technologies.

Samsung has missed the boat

US-based sensor manufacturer Synaptics unveiled its in-display fingerprint sensor last month. The company said that it would provide this component to smartphone manufacturers who want to add this functionality to their smartphones. Many thought that Samsung would use the in-display fingerprint sensor from Synaptics for the Galaxy S9 but given that we know what to expect from Galaxy S9, it’s not going to have an in-display fingerprint sensor as well.

Synaptics demonstrated its in-display fingerprint sensor with China-based smartphone manufacturer Vivo at the Consumer Electronics Show 2018 earlier this month. The device it was demonstrated on didn’t have a name or a launch date but it does now. The Vivo X20 Plus UD was officially launched earlier this week. It’s the world’s first commercially available smartphone with a fingerprint sensor that’s integrated into the display itself.

 

Users don’t have to participate in finger gymnastics in order to unlock their smartphone using the fingerprint sensor as they have to do on certain smartphones where the sensor’s placement leaves a lot to be desired. They just need to place a finger on the screen. It’s that simple and even though it might be just a little bit slower than conventional sensors, it’s far from a gimmick or a novelty. The X20 Plus UD has a fully functional in-display fingerprint sensor and it goes without saying that the technology is only going to get better from here on out.

For the longest time, Samsung was expected to be the first company to take this bold step and put a handset on the market that introduced the world to this technology. That title now goes to Vivo. It’s not like Vivo was striving for perfection here, the company didn’t introduce this technology with a flagship device. The $520 X20 Plus UD is actually an upgraded model of its existing X20 Plus mid-range handset, it’s powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 660 processor with 4GB RAM and features an 18:9 6.43-inch Super AMOLED display.

There’s nothing forcing Samsung to introduce an in-display fingerprint sensor with a flagship smartphone. It can take a chance on this technology with a premium mid-range or even a regular mid-range device. It’s not like the company doesn’t add features to mid-range smartphones that aren’t even available on its flagship handsets. Case in point: the dual front-facing camera on the Galaxy A8 (2018).

The surprising part is that Samsung might have bankrolled this achievement for Vivo itself. It was reported last year that Samsung had poured a lot of money into Synaptics’ in-display fingerprint technology because it wanted the component to be ready in time for the Galaxy S8. Synaptics wasn’t able to do that so Samsung ditched the idea. Technical challenges then forced Samsung to abandon the idea for the Galaxy Note 8 as well.

Synaptics has clearly made significant improvements since then otherwise Vivo wouldn’t be releasing a smartphone with an unreliable component and it soon might not be the only company that beat Samsung to the market with this technology. Vivo is owned by BBK Electronics, a privately held Chinese mega-company that also owns Oppo and OnePlus. If the X20 Plus UD is well received in the company’s home market it won’t take long for either of those companies to push out a handset with an in-display fingerprint sensor.

Samsung has long been the leader in innovative smartphone technologies. It popularized OLED displays for smartphones and has made a significant contribution in shifting the market to larger display sizes for handsets. The company showcased its innovative spirit with experimental handsets like the Galaxy Round and the Galaxy Note Edge – two handsets that told the world just how far advanced the company’s display technology was. They introduced us to the curved displays that the world fell in love with when Samsung used them in its flagship smartphones.

Nobody is asking Samsung to launch another experimental device that showcases the in-display fingerprint technology. A poll we conducted recently showed that not a lot of people are willing to buy experimental products regardless of how much they might cost, they will only consider them if the price isn’t too high.

The fact remains, though, that Samsung appears to be losing its quality of flinging stuff against the wall just to see what sticks. It’s this quality that brought about the second coming of the stylus with the Galaxy Note lineup at a time when many had written off this input method as a relic of the Palm handheld days. It’s this quality that brought us gorgeous dual-edge curved displays that make it impossible for many to switch back to a flat panel.

If Samsung is bent on introducing an in-display fingerprint sensor with a flagship smartphone then we might have to wait until the fall this year when the Galaxy Note 9 will be due and even then there’s no confirmation that this will happen. The Galaxy A8 (2018)was a missed opportunity because Samsung’s key premium mid-range lineup has also been revamped now and its successor isn’t due until early next year. For all we know, Samsung might not launch a device with an in-display fingerprint sensor until 2019 and it’s highly likely that multiple Chinese OEMs will have launched theirs by then.

Do you think that Samsung’s innovative edge that was behind some of its greatest products ever is fading? Should the company be doing more than just improvements to its existing technologies? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below.

 

SOURCE: sammobile.com

Xiaomi reportedly overtakes Samsung as top smartphone vendor in India

After potentially losing the top spot in feature phone sales to Reliance Jio in Q4 2017, Samsung has some bad news on the smartphone front as well. According to the latest data from market research firm Canalys, Xiaomi beat Samsung to emerge as the top smartphone vendor in India this part quarter.

Canalys says Xiaomi shipped close to 8.2 million units compared to Samsung’s 7.3 million smartphone shipments in Q4 2017. Xiaomi’s market share for the quarter stood at 27%, while Samsung came in second place at 25%. Together, they accounted for more than 50% of the smartphone market share in India for Q4 2017. Samsung registered an annual growth of 17%, but that was not enough to retain the top spot in the Indian market. Samsung was followed by Vivo, Oppo, and Lenovo for the next three spots.

Not final, but quite possible

It is worth pointing that smartphone shipment reports from market research firms are not always accurate and are typically based on incomplete and unofficial sources of data. In fact, reports from different firms often publish contradictory findings. However, it is not impossible that Xiaomi took over the top position from Samsung in India, given that there were visible signs of it last year.

Many market research firms were pointing to Xiaomi’s changing fortunes in India. In October, data from Counterpoint Research showed that while Samsung maintained its lead in Q3 2017, Xiaomi was at a striking distance to take over the top position. This was followed by Q3 2017 data from IDC which showed that both Samsung and Xiaomi were both tied at 23.5% market share.

An interesting factor to note in all these reports is that sales of Samsung smartphones are not declining in India, but instead Xiaomi is growing at a much faster rate than Samsung. The smartphone market in India is still growing and Xiaomi is taking a much larger pie of the growing market. The fact that Samsung reported a 27% increase in mobile revenues in India amidst all this noise of Xiaomi beating Samsung speaks volumes about the nature of expanding smartphone market in India.

Samsung’s weak point in India seems to be its mid-range and budget devices. None of them matches Xiaomi’s value for money offerings. There has been a lot of talk about Samsung revamping its strategy in India to counter Xiaomi. However, the efforts and the results so far are nothing substantial. It will be interesting to see how Samsung responds to Xiaomi’s onslaught in 2018.

Samsung Pay has processed transactions of 100 million euro in Spain so far

Samsung Pay is undoubtedly one of the best and most widely accepted mobile payments services out there. By acquiring LoopPay and integrating its patented MST technology into its smartphones and smartwatches, Samsung was able to roll out a service that quickly became popular in markets where it was launched.

More than two million transactions in Spain last year

Since its launch in various markets, Samsung Pay has been enjoying a high satisfaction rate among its users. In another instance of Samsung’s Pay’s growing popularity, the company has announced in a press release today that Samsung Pay has processed transactions of 100 million euro in Spain since its launch in 2016. Samsung says the service was used for more than two million transactions in Spain last year alone.

The press release also quotes a study conducted by IPSOS for Samsung, where 75% of the respondents were already aware of the mobile-based payment solutions and 56% of the respondents frequently use them for their simplicity and convenience. Even those 44% respondents who were unaware of mobile-payment solutions were willing to use once they were informed about them. The press release doesn’t make it clear if these numbers are specific to Samsung Pay or all mobile payment solutions in general.

According to Celestino García, Corporate Vice President of Samsung Spain, being able to use Samsung Pay is one of the reasons for 70% of the existing Samsung customers to buy Samsung products again. To further solidify its claim about the loyalty enjoyed by Samsung Pay, Samsung says 75% of the respondents who expressed a high satisfaction rate with the service attributed it to convenience and simplicity, while 74% of the respondents were willing to recommend the service to family and friends without any hesitation.

Unlike NFC based mobile payment solutions such as Android Pay and Apple Pay, Samsung Pay works with almost every PoS terminal that can accept your credit card or debit card. Samsung Pay achieves this universality by combining both patented MST technology and NFC service into a single intelligent payment solution. This makes Samsung Pay more widely accepted and easy to use, leading to its growing popularity and adoption.

iPhone X: Five things that drive me absolutely nuts

For well over two months, my days have ended and begun with the iPhone X. Compared to older iPhones, the X feels impressively fast, slim and, with 5.8 inches of screen space, satisfyingly spacious. But as I’ve grown to appreciate some of its finer points, I’ve also discovered the traits that make me roll my eyes, gnash my teeth and occasionally erupt with a well-chosen expletive.

The funny thing is that almost all of these ire-inducing “quirks” stem from Apple’s redesign of the iPhone X, which removed the home button and installed a bunch of swipes and taps to cover all navigation bases.

On one hand, Face ID and gestures prove that iPhone users can live without a home button. On the other, learning the ropes takes time, and the swipey stand-ins don’t always make a lot of sense. Some iPhone X gestures feel half-baked.

So here we go, my five personal worst iPhone X navigation offenders. Stay tuned for a future piece on some of the things I truly do love about the iPhone X.

Face ID never works when I most need it

Face ID, Apple’s replacement for the secure fingerprint reader, uses the iPhone X’s front-facing camera to approve mobile purchases and unlock the phone.

It works by making a 3D map of your eyes, nose and mouth — except when it doesn’t. Face ID recognizes me often, but fails enough times to make me notice. For example, I have about a 50-50 success rate while wearing my polarized sunglasses.

When it doesn’t work is when I want it to most: as soon as I wake up in the morning. Part of the problem is biological. I’m near-sighted, which means that when I first reach for the phone while my glasses and contacts are resting in their cases, I wind up holding the phone closer to my face than the 25 to 50 centimeters that Apple recommends.

And then there’s the fact that in my groggy morning state, I’m lying on my side with either one eye closed, or my face buried in my pillow.

There’s no way Face ID is boring its way through that, and it’s not Apple’s fault.

What is Apple’s fault is that the iPhone X doesn’t have a satisfying backup plan to my morning squinty-eye. With Face ID, you don’t get an immediate second chance to biometrically unlock the phone, not the way you do when the fingerprint scanner on a home button fails; you just tap it again.

No such luck here. You can wait some long seconds only to have to try again, or lock and unlock the phone to kickstart a new Face ID scan.

More often than not, I wind up typing in my 6-digit password, which is faster than waiting for Face ID to maybe or maybe not unlock. This gets annoying when you do it multiple times a day, every day. I’d love a biometric backup, or a faster do-over time if Face ID misses the scan the first time around.

Bleh battery life

If you’re switching from an older iPhone with battery life that can barely hobble through a single day (especially if Apple did this), the iPhone X is a fantastic upgrade. At least at first.

After two months, I noticed a steep battery decline. Of course your charge will take a hit every time you stream music or video, or use navigation. That’s life with a phone. But even on days when I didn’t engage these things, I found myself topping up the power reserves before going out for the night, unconvinced my phone would make it through the evening activities.

When you live on your phone — texting, looking up stuff online, reading e-books — that uncertainty makes the difference between a device you can trust and one you have to constantly manage.

This isn’t just anecdotal, either. In CNET’s looping-video tests, the iPhone X lasted just shy of 11.5 hours average after 9 tests. That’s two hours less than the iPhone 8and iPhone 8 Plus results with the same test, and six hours less than the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 (17.5 hours).

Anecdotally, it lasts longer than the iPhone 8 in real-life use, but peters out before the 8 Plus loses steam.

These time windows don’t seem so short in a vacuum, but when you compare the results across the board, the iPhone X — the most expensive mainstream phone you can buy — drains as quickly as some midrange phones that cost less than half the price, if not faster.

To make matters more frustrating, Apple hides the iPhone X battery percentage meter; it isn’t visible at a glance. Instead, you have to swipe down from the top of the phone on the right side of the notch to call up the Control Center. Only then can you keep a detailed tab on how much juice you have left.

Maps navigation shortcut only goes one way

I use maps navigation quite a lot. When you pop out of either Google Maps or Apple Maps to do something else, the iPhone X helpfully puts a tiny blue Tic Tac around the clock, turning it into a nifty little button you can tap to pop back into the map again.

This is great, but Apple stops short. See, you can toggle from any app back into the map, but you can’t toggle from the map back to what you were doing before. So if you’re reading an article, you can pop into the map to check on the directions (using the shortcut) but won’t be able to return to the story (no shortcut).

When you get used to pressing that shortcut button a couple dozen times during a long trip, you’ll be cursing Apple that it only goes one way. Hopefully a future version of the software will make toggling a two-way street.

By the way, the shortcut also works with the phone app (the button turns green), voice memos (red) and some third-party apps.

Is the alarm on or what?

I’m an inveterate nervous-alarm-setter, even on weekends. I just can’t relax unless I know I won’t oversleep (yes, I have problems).

That doesn’t stop me from waking up bleary-eyed in the middle of the night second-guessing if I set the alarm for the right time, or even set it at all. I would like to be able to glance at the iPhone X and immediately see the alarm clock icon reassure me, before drifting back to sleep.

This is how it was pre-iPhone X and still is on the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus. Yet for some reason, Apple has decided to bury this information. You can still see it — and your remaining battery percentage — but you have to pull down the Control Center first.

I don’t want to mess with my phone at 4am. I don’t want to swipe a screen or use more brain cells than I have to. In short, I don’t want to do anything that could wake me up and make falling back asleep harder than it needs to be.

I use maps navigation quite a lot. When you pop out of either Google Maps or Apple Maps to do something else, the iPhone X helpfully puts a tiny blue Tic Tac around the clock, turning it into a nifty little button you can tap to pop back into the map again.

This is great, but Apple stops short. See, you can toggle from any app back into the map, but you can’t toggle from the map back to what you were doing before. So if you’re reading an article, you can pop into the map to check on the directions (using the shortcut) but won’t be able to return to the story (no shortcut).

When you get used to pressing that shortcut button a couple dozen times during a long trip, you’ll be cursing Apple that it only goes one way. Hopefully a future version of the software will make toggling a two-way street.

By the way, the shortcut also works with the phone app (the button turns green), voice memos (red) and some third-party apps.

Is the alarm on or what?

I’m an inveterate nervous-alarm-setter, even on weekends. I just can’t relax unless I know I won’t oversleep (yes, I have problems).

That doesn’t stop me from waking up bleary-eyed in the middle of the night second-guessing if I set the alarm for the right time, or even set it at all. I would like to be able to glance at the iPhone X and immediately see the alarm clock icon reassure me, before drifting back to sleep.

This is how it was pre-iPhone X and still is on the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus. Yet for some reason, Apple has decided to bury this information. You can still see it — and your remaining battery percentage — but you have to pull down the Control Center first.

I don’t want to mess with my phone at 4am. I don’t want to swipe a screen or use more brain cells than I have to. In short, I don’t want to do anything that could wake me up and make falling back asleep harder than it needs to be.

Apple’s also changed the buttons you press to take a screenshot and power down the phone. If you mess this up, you might find yourself accidentally calling 911.

You have to know which side of the Notch to swipe for the quick-controls in Control Center (the right side) and which to swipe for your notifications (the left). And now, you double-press the lock button to finish installing an app and hold it down to fire up Siri.

While these changes are absolutely learnable, and even become second-nature over time, the iPhone X’s navigability is a far cry from the logical layout that made the iPhone stand out from every other phone of its day.

It’s not that I wish the iPhone X reverted to the stripped-down style of the original iPhone. It’s that Apple, in paving the way with some new technologies, had the opportunity to rethink how we use a phone, and wound up making it more complicated to use — not less.

 

SOURCE: cnet.com

 

Apple tipped to launch four iPhones in 2018, and keep the iPhone X on sale

It’s a busy weekend for iPhone rumors, with Asian media outlets reporting several whisperings around Apple’s plans for 2018. We could see as many as four new iPhones appear this year, and it now seems likely that the iPhone X will stay on sale too.

Previous reports had suggested Apple was planning to cancel production of the iPhone X once its successors were on the market, but that’s not the case according to a report from The Investor. It says the current top-tier phone is going to stay as the smallest and presumably the cheapest of the full-sized iPhones.

The same report says new 5.85-inch and 6.46-inch iPhones are in the works, with OLED screens sourced from a increased number of suppliers. That’s all based on “sources” from the supply chain speaking to The Investor, so take it with a pinch of salt for now.

Choose your model

Meanwhile an analyst at DigiTimes weighs in to say four iPhones are in development, three of which will see the light of day: a 5.7 to 5.8-inch LCD model, a 6.0 to 6.1-inch LCD model, and a 6.4 to 6.5-inch OLED model. Obviously everyone can’t be right.

That two-LCD and one-OLED approach would match what Apple did last year with the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X. Another model with a 6.0 to 6.1-inch screen is also on the drawing board but is eventually going to be scrapped, DigiTimes says.

The report also claims that a new iPhone SE 2 is going to beat all of these full-sized iPhones to the market, arriving sometime in the spring. It will apparently include a glass back for wireless charging, but not the 3D sensing tech required for Face ID.

 

SOURCE: techradar.com

It’s official: Galaxy S9 launching on February 25 with ‘reimagined’ camera

How do you make it clear what a new flagship smartphone will be all about ahead of the smartphone’s unveiling? By telling us directly through the phone’s launch invite, that’s how. For the Galaxy S9, the focus seems to be on the camera. Samsung is sending out invites for the February 25th Galaxy S9 UNPACKED event, with the words “The camera. Reimagined” in and around the number 9.

Galaxy S9 launching on February 25 with “reimagined” camera

Now, we already know that at least the Galaxy S9+ will launch with dual rear cameras, but since the Note 8 had them as well, it would be odd for Samsung to call it a reimagining just because the S9 will have two rear cameras instead of one. But if recent leaks are accurate, the Galaxy S9 will have quite a few new camera tricks up its sleeve. A variable aperture (like the one seen on Samsung’s latest flip phone flagship), slow-mo videos at 480 frames per second in 1080p Full HD, and improved low-light autofocus speeds are some of the features that we’re expecting, with some corroborated by the company’s official information about its new ISOCELL camera sensor.

There’s no telling how many of these features will be on the Galaxy S9, or whether the dual cameras would be offered on both the S9 and S9+. But one thing is certain: Samsung looks set to drastically improve the camera experience with the Galaxy S9. The last time the company did something game-changing with its cameras was when it introduced Dual Pixel autofocus on the Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 edge, and two years later sounds like the right time to knock it out of the park once again.

We’ll be at Samsung’s UNPACKED event for the Galaxy S9’s launch, and the company will no doubt have a live stream so anyone around the world can join in. The coming weeks should also bring us a few leaks that give us a better picture of what to expect from the new flagship. Samsung has done a good job of keeping things under wraps this year, but if history is any guide, the last few weeks almost always ruin the fun.

 

SOURCE: sammobile.com

Samsung’s patent shows authenticating users by measuring their blood flow patterns

Phone authentication mechanisms have come a long way from passwords and pattern locks to fingerprint readers, iris scanners, and face unlock. They certainly won’t stop there. Samsung’s new patent envisages an authentication system based on a user’s blood flow pattern.

The patent application titled ‘Real Time Authentication Based on Blood Flow Parameters’ was filed in July 2016 in the US. The patent describes a method to identify users based on blood flow patterns in their fingers or wrists using sensors in smartphones and smartwatches.

It can be a great addition to smartwatches

According to the patent application, it is possible to authenticate users based on their blood flow patterns as ‘the arterial conduction paths of different users are almost never identical’. Sensors in a smartphone or a smartwatch can thus collect data from different blood flow points to identify the users based on data patterns that are unique for every user.

If the patent works as described in a safe and reliable manner, then this new authentication method could be a nice addition to Samsung’s smartwatches. Since Samsung smartwatches can be used for Samsung Pay, an authentication system which doesn’t require any additional steps other than wearing the watch on your wrist is a big step forward in terms of simplicity and convenience.

This new authentication system can be an interesting addition to smartphones as well. Imagine a Samsung smartphone with embedded sensors that can authenticate you without making you place a finger on a scanner or looking into an iris scanner.

While the patent sounds innovative and useful, it is worth pointing that not all patents turn into actual products or features. Reasons could vary anywhere from technical challenges to cost considerations. So, while all of this sounds interesting, there’s no guarantee that Samsung will ever bring this to market.

 

 

SOURCE: sammobile.com